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Innovations and sustainability in our landscaping

Preserving and maintaining our natural assets is important to Goodman. Innovation – both in technology and in our thinking – has helped us make big leaps in sustainable landscaping practices in Australia.

 
Through pilot projects, collaboration with suppliers and trials of new technologies, we have been able to reorient our landscaping operations with sustainability front of mind. 

Technology-led solutions to reduce water waste

Last year we installed 384 potable water meter devices – at least one on each Australian property. These meters track the 1,468 megalitres of water used across our portfolio every year. Their real time data helps customers understand their water usage and identify leaks or wastage so that they can be repaired well before a bill arrives. 

We also deployed smart irrigation across Goodman’s Australian portfolio. This technology-led solution is so smart that individual garden beds can be remotely controlled, reducing water use at some properties by 54%. 

 

Making our landscaping practices more sustainable

We used new technology to reduce the chemicals used to tackle weeds. After comparing various low-toxic weed control options, we trialled new equipment combining saturated steam and boiling water. This solution helps nurture soil and use less of the chemical Glyphosate. We are working closely with the manufacturer to make it more portable so we can use it more widely.

From December 2022 all our landscaping contractors will need to use lithium battery-powered blowers, hedge trimmers and other handheld landscaping equipment. These are lighter, quieter and easier to handle than combustion options – and don’t rely on fossil fuels for power.

 

A sustainable approach to trees 

We have around 21,000 trees across our Australian portfolio. We have a maintenance plan in place which helps maintain optimum health and longevity. Soon, when our trees are trimmed, the branches will be broken down into mulch, soil or compost and then reused. A green waste recycling pilot project on several Goodman properties in Sydney processed an estimated 500 cubic metres of green waste in just six months. This project will soon roll out nationally.